HP eNews Update - November 2017

www.menopause.org.au November 2018
HP eNews

Welcome to AMS HP eNews for doctors and other healthcare professionals who have a special interest in women's health. The content covers information and resources relevant to menopause, midlife and the promotion of healthy ageing.

In this edition


November 2017

Breaking News - Oestrogen patch update - supply returned

Novartis has advised that the company has both received and released stock for supply locally of the following lines;

  • ESTALIS SEQ 50MCG/50+ 140MCG
  • ESTALIS SEQ 50MCG/50+ 250MCG

As a result the only remaining HRT line now still unavailable is ESTALIS CONT 50+250MCG

This line is confirmed for arrival into Sydney early next week - 4 December 2017.

Novartis is in the process of re-stocking wholesalers for all products and the products should be in pharmacies sometime next week.

Postmenopausal obesity redefined

BMI may not be valid measure of obesity status in older adults

There is no doubt the prevalence of obesity has increased significantly across all age groups, creating greater health risks. What exactly constitutes obesity, however, is subject to debate, especially for postmenopausal women who have a different body composition than younger women. An American study, demonstrates that the long-accepted BMI definition for obesity may no longer be accurate.

Body mass index (BMI) is the most widely used indicator of obesity. Despite its common usage, there is growing concern in the medical community that BMI is not a valid measure of obesity in older adults because it doesn't account for the location of body tissue used for the storage of fat, differentiate between fat mass and lean mass, or account for variation in body composition. This creates challenges for healthcare providers who must assess obesity-related health risks in their patients. The challenge is magnified when treating older women because of the significant physical changes that occur during the postmenopausal period, including changes in body weight, redistribution of fat tissue, decrease in skeletal muscle mass, and loss of height...

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Discontinuing hormone therapy increases risk of cardiac and stroke death

Hormone therapy (HT) continues to be a hotly debated topic. The benefits of estrogen to the heart, however, appear to be universally accepted. A European study demonstrates that the risk of cardiac and stroke death actually increases in the first year after discontinuation of HT.

Since publication of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial data, there has been significant disagreement over the various risks and benefits of HT. What remains relatively unchallenged is the fact that estrogen has rapid beneficial vascular effects and that shorter periods between the onset of menopause and the initiation of HT provide greater protection against cardiovascular disease. This beneficial relationship between HT and protection against heart disease has led to the speculation that withdrawal from HT could result in clinically significant changes in arterial function. Although previous studies have shown that termination of estradiol-based HT led to significant increases in the risk of cardiac and stroke deaths, particularly during the first year, these results were questioned because women with documented heart problems had not been excluded from the study...

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Women's memory may benefit from hormone replacement therapy

A type of hormone replacement therapy may protect memory for some women, according to an American study.

The research findings are the latest to indicate that hormone replacement therapy may have some benefits, deepening scientific discussions about the pros and cons of the menopausal treatment.

"Our study suggests that estrogen treatment after menopause protects the memory that is needed for short-term cognitive tasks from the effects of stress," said Alexandra Ycaza Herrera, the study's lead author and a researcher at the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology.

Earlier studies have pointed to potential health risks of the treatment. A combination therapy that uses both estrogen and progesterone has been linked to a higher risk of breast cancer, heart disease, stroke and blood clots.

The researchers found that women taking estrogen-only therapy had lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol and performed better on tests of "working memory" following exposure to stress compared to women taking a placebo...

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Join AMS for Member's only content 

The Timing Hypothesis - NAMS Video

Dr Schnatz, Past President of NAMS and Associate Chairman and Residency Program Director in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Reading Hospital in Pennsylvania, discusses the benefits of starting women on hormone therapy at the beginning of the menopause transition, along with the cardiovascular health advantages.

Our Menopause World November 2017

See all the articles such as: Chen YC, Greenbaum J, Shen H, Deng HW. Association between gut microbiota and bone health: potential mechanisms and prospective. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2017;102:3635-46

Latest from IMS Live - One-third of dementia may be preventable with lifestyle change

Reduced exposure to dementia risk factors and increased exposure to protective factors create a 'cognitive buffer', reducing the progression to, or delaying the onset of, dementia.

Climacteric E-alert - Volume 20, Number 6

REVIEW: Neurokinin3 receptor antagonism - the magic bullet for hot flushes?

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